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20130827
20130827
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
in mississippi. >> we can do 400,000. >> reporter: 400,000 in one day? >> pounds, yes. >> that is a lot of fish. >> that is a lot of fish. >> reporter: he's one of the biggest catfish processors in the country and one of the driving forces for getting the u.s. department of agriculture to inspect catfish grown here and imported. critics call that a huge waste of taxpayer money. there is one big problem. >> you already have the fda inspecting seafood. >> that's not correct. we have fda but that's a nonexistent inspection. >> reporter: believe it or not, two federal agencies are supposed to inspect the same fish. the usda spent $20 million just for planning those inspections. while there have been concerns about the adequacy of inspections of imported fish in the past, do we need usda inspection, too? >> we would say there is food safety concern. >> no. a catfish is a catfish is a catfish. it's a safe food. >> reporter: david acheson is one of the country's foremost food safety experts who says catfish is not a high risk food and the fda should continue to be in charge of inspecting it. >> the on
. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every person to cast a ballot. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom must be tended to in order -- for us to grow. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable mit
building of the kiesler air force base inbiloxi, mississippi. asyo middle of quite a heft at this lightening storm. >> got hit right there. >> oh. >> whoa! >> what did i say? i got that [ bleep ], bro. >> a gigantic bolt comes down right exactly smack dab where this guy said he thought the bolt was going to strike. >> it hit like right there. >> you can't predict that! is it real? is it real? >> yeah. yeah. >> so he really did predict where that lightening would sfliek. >> he didn't necessarily predict it, he said, what if it hit right there, right in front of us. >> hit right there. >> boom! right in front of this guy. >> wow. >> that is close. >> that's kind of like serious hand of god lightening right there. >> alleluia. >> are they filming from the cover of any kind of shelter? because it seems like they're standing just outside in the storm. it's amazing that the lightening struck the top of the building and not right where they were standing. >> yeah. it's a positive thing when the lightening is coming down. it looks like something you can reach up and grab. other bo
, in the delta of mississippi. >> and there was a line about marching through the south like sherman which had to be exercised before you delivered, isn't that right? >> it is true that i did have a line in the speech that said in effect if we do not see meaningful progress here today, the day will come, when we will not confine our marching in washington. but we may be forced to march through the south the way sherman did nonviolently. the archbishop of washington -- if i did not delete that part of the speech. and we had some discussion the evening before the march. and later someone came to me and said how is your speech and i said, we have to make some changes you have to delete something. and i remember having a discussion with mr. wilkins and i said roy, this is my speech. and i'm speaking for the young people. speaking people fresh from jails. and he sort of dropped it. and randolph and martin luther king, jr. came to me. and we met right on the side of mr. lincoln. the music was already playing. someone had a portable;÷ñ÷ typewriter. and dr. king said to me, john that doesn't sound
. you saw selma in the 1965 voting rights act. you saw the mississippi summer project in the 1964 civil rights bill. you saw affirmative action, you saw all of these things grow out of that. you saw an effort to empower marginalize eed people across te country. we used the model we were using in terms of organizing and sex-determination pulling people together so they could take control of their own lives. those models were actually both things that grew out of the movement. washington is one of those epic points that there are a number of other epic points that actually pulled this whole process together. i think it's important to understand that even on the struggles on the march on washington, get the message out. >>ifill: we are still having big national conversations as they say about race, still coming out of the trayvon martin episode. and i wonder as you look back we wonder whether it's leadership that's missing, whether we're just not honest as a people in discussing these issues or whether we've come much further than they give us credit for? >> i think we have come a long way
to mississippi. and we were there. and then we went up to birmingham, alabama, we were there. we heard the same story time and time again. a woman is being abused. the neighbor woman calls up and ghesz who goes to jail? the person who calls them the abuser. the man turns around and says that woman doesn't have papers. what does law enforcement do? that's why you have to separate law enforcement from immigration policy. the police is there to protect the people. they have to protect the women and the families. we have to understand how safety has a corrosive effect. the police -- their cars are important to them, to protect us. their guns are important to them to protect us, their communication, their training is important. but the most important tool, instrument that the police have? it's the people and the cooperation of the people. and when you pass immigration law, they criminalize all immigrants and make them fear the police, you make all of us less safe. and you make us all a nation in which we perpetrate injustice of our people here who have been submitted to crimes and to criminals. so,
that stretched across texas, mississippi, alabama and georgia. david mattingly is "out front" on this story. hi, david. what did investigators find? >> well, first of all, they found 367 dogs. over 100 of them just in one single location. they have arrested ten men, seven of them came from the state of alabama. but this goes beyond just fighting dogs and the atrocities involved in that. they're looking at what they seized here in terms of money. they seized a half million dollars in this raid on friday that shows you just what big money is being had at these dogfighting operations. now, they also believe that some of these defendants may have been gambling as much as $200,000 on a single dogfight. again, showing you what kind of money was involved in these operations so doing much further than just dogfighting. they're also looking at illegal gambling operations and what sort of organizations might be out there associated with this. >> that is big money. what will happen to these dogs? >> well, right now, they're in emergency shelters. they're being cared for. they're getting medical treatment,
, mississippi, who has everybody fired up at just 5 years old, samuel green realized he had a special gift. >> three years later he's a veteran of the pulpit inspiring everyone who wants to listen wherever he goes. take a look. >> he had nothing. he lost his land. he lost his animals. he lost his sons and daughters. but do you know what jobe did? jobe fell to his knees an began worshiping god saying the lord has gave and the lord has taken away. blessed be the name of the lord. >> preaching it there, samuel. samuel is here with his mother and his mentor. welcome to everybody. >> hello. >> hi. >> you are just a bright light, aren't you sitting over there. >> yes. >> and even without those teeth. it's unbelievable. >> when you are up there preaching, are you just memorizing things? tell us what you are doing when you are up there. >> it's something i do every day stuff and i really don't forget it. i really don't get nervous because i know god has my back. >> god has your back. >> so are all your sermons about bible stories? >> well, yes. >> do you have a favorite one, like david and goliath
today? -- is a catfish legend in mississippi. >> we can do 400,000. >> 400,000 in one day. >> yes. >> a lot of fish. >> a lot of fish. >> reporter: one of the biggest catfish processors in the country. one of the driving forces for getting the u.s. department of agriculture to get it here. critics call that a huge waste of millions of your tax dollars because there is one big problem. you have fda inspecting? >> that's not correct. we have fda all right, a nonexistent inspection. >> reporter: believe it or not, two federal agencies are supposed to inspect the same fish. the usda spent $20 million for planning the inspections. while there have been concerns about the adequacy of inspections of imported fish in the past, do we really need usda inspection too? >> there are food safety concerns. >> catfish is a cat fish is a catfish. a safe food. >> reporter: one of the foremost food safety experts, former fda and usda official who says catfish is not a high risk food and fda should continue to be in charge of inspecting it. >> certainly isn't public health. the only thing you are lef
in mississippi, civil rights leader medgar evers organized voter registration efforts. evers was assassinated in 1963 mere months before the march on washington. since then as a civil rights activist and former executive director of the naacp, his widow myrlie evers williams has carried on his legacy. she joins me sitting rights here, along with joy reid, manager the grio and msnbc contributor. i have been chasing after you, joy. i see you everywhere but here. now i've got you here finally. you are very smart about this stuff. and i know you're from the younger generation. i want to get myrlie on this too. i want you to react to this. a couple of things. it's not just minority voters that benefit from traditional voting patterns. the easier way to vote, younger people have a harder time budgeting their time. they just do for whatever reason. the easier it is to vote, the more are going to vote. african-american voters, many don't have money to have a car, don't have a driver's license, may be older living in row houses like i used to live as a kid, and they basically have a hard time coming u
and how deep the movement is. it doesn't matter if it's in virginia, in mississippi, illinois, california, across this country, people are demanding comprehensive immigration reform and the end of the deportations and the destruction of our families. someone in the activity yesterday. i was in minneapolis st. paul. the church was full. it was full. but she bemoaned the fact that more people didn't come. she said they department come. some were tired, frustrated, and disillusioned. guess what? virginia is giving the example today. no one has the right to be tired or disillusioned. no one has the right to give up on this fight. today 1,200 people will be deported. children will be left without a mom or a dad, husband or a wife. the fear that permeates our community and the underclass exploited every day has to come to an end. you do not have the right to be tired. you have a responsibility to fight to make this a greater nation for all of us to live and va rah today is giving that example. thank you so much. [ speaking spanish ] we're going to win immigration reform because we have leaders
by the church in philadelphia, mississippi, a worker from boston was beaten to death. the day of this demonstration we have six people shot in washington the same day. black americans right now, young people, we lose 3000 every six months. we have a 9/11 every six months. over 4000 died in 40 years of lynching. we could lose more than that in one year. the priorities that we have are not racism. just because i say that i need tires for my car, my mother gots heart surgery, we have to establish priorities. because i spend my resources helping my mother does not mean i do not need tires. the challenge we face is we are going to give voice to the least of all its children as a measure of our effectiveness and leadership? [applause] the answers will come by going sufferingommunities of problem, and finding out not from the 70% of the households that are raising children, dropping out, but what is happening in the 30% of the households of the people who are not dropping out of school, in jail, on drugs. we just rolled a young lady in going toin teske, college, and for years she has
or in mississippi or in illinois or in california. across this country, people are demanding comprehensive immigration reform, and the end of the deportations of the direction of our families -- destruction of the family. someone in the -- i was in minneapolis-saint paul. the church was full. she bemoaned the fact that more people didn't come. they didn't come. and some were tired and frustrated and they were disillusioned. guess what? virginia is giving the example today no one has a right to be tired. [cheering and applause] nobody has a right to be disillusioned. nobody has a right to give up on this fight. because today 1,200 people will be deported. hundreds of children will be left without a poem -- mom or a dad. without husband or wife. the fear that permeates our community and the underclass that exploited every day has to come to an end. you don't are -- have a right to be tired. you have a responsibility to fight and make it a greater and better nation for us to live. virginia today is giving that example. thank you so much. [applause] [cheering and applause] [inaudible] [speakin
of my favorite images of dr. king is from 1966 in mississippi when he is marching with stokely carmichael wright once told it was about to drop the phrase yellow, black power. dr. king because he was not jealous or insecure or disrespectful for younger people, we need to say that, even though he was a nobel peace prize winner, he had let the march on washington to get done all these incredible things. he listened to this younger rather than stokely carmichael explain why we should not call ourselves negroes anymore and embrace black power. dr. king felt like because he's a leader in the think it's important we define what a leader is. she or he because no more of the male stuff as i said, she or he changes the direction of the conversation, comes up with a nubile kegger. what did dr. king say? okay, i'm going to write an essay which anyone industry should read because you want to know what the blueprint is? it's called black power redefined by dr. king. part of the problem is we get so stuck in 1963, evolves and changes in again to put some teeth on his vision is our target ins
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)